Intel 7 nm "on track"? 10 nm to be mostly skipped?

By: Wes Felter (wmf.delete@this.felter.org), December 6, 2018 1:21 pm
Room: Moderated Discussions
Via AnandTech. Clearly we can't take Intel's word at face value given the repeated claims that 10 nm was "on track" followed by delays, but it's interesting to contemplate. If 10 nm is coming in late 2019 and 7 nm will be available in 2020 then it may not make sense to release the whole product stack on 10 nm.

I've also wondered about Intel's processor development. If they planned to release Ice Lake in 2017 then its design would have been essentially finished in 2016. Does that mean Tiger Lake was finished in 2017 and Alder Lake is being finished now? On one hand it doesn't make sense that Intel would have N generations of processor designs sitting on a shelf unreleased waiting for the fab to become ready, but on the other hand what are Intel's teams doing if not designing new processors?
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TopicPosted ByDate
Intel 7 nm "on track"? 10 nm to be mostly skipped?Wes Felter2018/12/06 01:21 PM
  Intel 7 nm "on track"? 10 nm to be mostly skipped?Maynard Handley2018/12/06 01:49 PM
    Intel 7 nm "on track"? 10 nm to be mostly skipped?passerby2018/12/06 05:50 PM
  Intel 7 nm "on track"? 10 nm to be mostly skipped?Doug S2018/12/06 03:11 PM
    Intel 7 nm "on track"? 10 nm to be mostly skipped?Groo2018/12/06 05:18 PM
      Intel 7 nm "on track"? 10 nm to be mostly skipped?Yo2018/12/06 05:54 PM
        Intel 7 nm "on track"? 10 nm to be mostly skipped?Groo2018/12/06 07:33 PM
          Thank you! (NT)Anon2018/12/07 08:16 AM
  either way, Intel will be fineDaniel B2018/12/07 04:41 AM
    either way, Intel will be fineanon.12018/12/07 11:11 AM
  Intel 7 nm "on track"? 10 nm to be mostly skipped?Ricardo B2018/12/07 11:55 AM
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