Intel vs AMD patents

By: Beastian (noemail.delete@this.aol.com), April 20, 2019 3:35 pm
Room: Moderated Discussions
Yuhong Bao (yuhongbao_386.delete@this.hotmail.com) on April 20, 2019 2:32 pm wrote:
> Beastian (noemail.delete@this.aol.com) on April 19, 2019 9:05 am wrote:
> > Does anyone think that the upcoming expiry of patents on the core x86-64 instruction set
> > which includes SSE2, maybe sooner than 2023 (as the Athlon 64 was introduced in 2003) would
> > open the flood gates for third party implementations of compatible processors?
> >
> > The basic architecture including importantly the memory model could freely be implemented in hardware
> > once that core instruction set falls out of patent; I'm unclear about the amount of traction that later
> > Intel instructions have gotten in common software, but emulation could at least ensure compatibility.
> > Competition in x86 implementation has languished for long
> > stretches of time, though it has seen a resurgence
> > as of late; compare that to the ARM ecosystem which has seen vast improvements due to a larger number
> > of implementers: Apple, Qualcomm, nVidia, Samsung, ARM, Applied Micro and Cavium.
>
> Most of the x86-64 patents are owned by AMD. Most of the SSE2 patents are owned by Intel. I would
> imagine that AMD would be more willing to license their patents than Intel would, right?

There is a complex cross licensing agreement between AMD and Intel which was updated in 2015, but to my knowledge, no official licensing has been extended outside these two by either except for a few Chinese tech transfer deals. In the past, Intel has consistently tried to put anti-competitive legal or financial roadblocks in the way of third party implementers as well as contracted licensees like AMD including rebates for vendors who didn't use competing products, invoking patents on other necessary parts of implementation like memory controllers, crippling compiler generated code for competitor CPUs etc.

Today, there don't seem to be as many roadblocks or technical advantages for Intel for x86 compatible clones although Intel fired off a warning shot regarding Microsoft's emulation of x86 for Windows on ARM; perhaps the rest of the industry is still reeling from having had to deal with Intel and would prefer to implement ARM CPUs to avoid that history.
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TopicPosted ByDate
Expiry of x86-64 patentsBeastian2019/04/19 09:05 AM
  Expiry of x86-64 patentsGian-Carlo Pascutto2019/04/19 09:46 AM
    Expiry of x86-64 patentsBeastian2019/04/19 10:06 AM
    Expiry of x86-64 patentsJukka Larja2019/04/19 10:44 AM
      Expiry of x86-64 patentsGian-Carlo Pascutto2019/04/19 11:12 AM
        Expiry of x86-64 patentsJukka Larja2019/04/19 12:41 PM
          Expiry of x86-64 patentsRobert Williams2019/04/19 01:18 PM
          Expiry of x86-64 patentsGian-Carlo Pascutto2019/04/19 02:35 PM
      Expiry of x86-64 patentsGeoff Langdale2019/04/19 02:52 PM
        Expiry of x86-64 patentsJukka Larja2019/04/19 09:38 PM
      Expiry of x86-64 patentsYuhong Bao2019/04/20 02:35 PM
  Expiry of x86-64 patentsDoug S2019/04/19 10:40 AM
    Expiry of x86-64 patentsBeastian2019/04/19 11:10 AM
      Expiry of x86-64 patentsRobert Williams2019/04/20 08:15 AM
  Expiry of x86-64 patentsanyone2019/04/20 07:11 AM
    Expiry of x86-64 patentsGroo2019/04/20 07:29 AM
      Expiry of x86-64 patentswumpus2019/04/20 08:32 AM
  Intel vs AMD patentsYuhong Bao2019/04/20 02:32 PM
    Intel vs AMD patentsBeastian2019/04/20 03:35 PM
  Expiry of x86-64 patentsTravis Downs2019/04/20 07:24 PM
    Expiry of x86-64 patentsnone2019/04/21 07:36 AM
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